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Schedule

The following artists will perform at the National Hispanic Cultural Center for ¡Globalquerque! 2015 (Sept. 25-26). Performances will take place on three stages, all located at the NHCC (1701 4th St SW, at Avenida César Chávez). Enjoy the intimate courtyard setting of the Fountain Courtyard, the state of the art 692-seat Albuquerque Journal Theatre and dance outside on the Plaza Mayor.

Grounds open at 4 PM and performances start at 6:20 PM (Friday)/6 PM (Saturday) and run until at least 11:40 pm. The Global Village will be open into the night. There will also be FREE day programming on Saturday for families and adults, including workshops on music and folklore, crafts, and live performances. Visit the Global Fiesta page for more info.

Friday:
Aurelio (Honduras)
Fareed Ayaz and Abu Muhammad (Pakistan)
Cimarrón (Colombia)
Joy Harjo (Mvskoke Nation)
Emel Mathlouthi (Tunisia)
Otava Yo (Russian Federation)
Slavic Soul Party! (USA/Balkan)
Nano Stern (Chile)
- Two More Artists To Be Booked!

Saturday:
Cimarrón (Colombia)
Germán Díaz (Spain)
Ricardo Lemvo (Angola/Congo)
Emel Mathlouthi (Tunisia)
- Six More Artists To Be Booked!

Date TBA:
Lone Piñon (New Mexico)

Aurelio (Honduras)

AurelioBorn in the tiny coastal hamlet of Plaplaya on Honduras’ Caribbean coast, Aurelio may be one of the last generations to grow up steeped in Garifuna tradition. These traditions encompass the African and Caribbean Indian roots of his ancestors, a group of shipwrecked slaves who intermarried with local natives on the island of St. Vincent, only to be deported to the Central American coast in the late eighteenth century.

Aurelio recalls his humble but highly musical beginnings in his remote hometown. “In the village I was born, there is still no electricity,” he told Afropop Worldwide. “When I was a child, I had very natural toys. My first toy was a guitar I built for myself from wood taken from a fishing rod. So that’s how I played my first chords.”

Aurelio credits his mother Maria, who dreamed of being a professional singer, with introducing him to the basics of Garifuna songcraft. Like many Garifuna, she composed her own songs based on community events and her personal experience. She would teach the verse and chorus of the songs to her son, who would then go on to build on the tale by adding another verse, in traditional Garifuna style.

Aurelio's first solo album Garifuna Soul explored his roots in both paranda and traditional rhythms. Aurelio’s richly resonant voice and soulful acoustic songs caught the attention of the global music press and put him on the map as a tradition-bearer with an innate musicality and subtle innovative streak.

A consummate singer, percussionist, and guitarist, Aurelio's passion flows not only from his love of music, but also from his commitment to the cause of raising awareness and appreciation for Garifuna music and culture, both at home in Garifuna communities and internationally. “We’re not going to let this culture die,” says Aurelio. “I know I must continue the culture of my grandparents, of my ancestors, and find new ways to express it. Few people know about it, but I adore it, and it’s something I must share with the world.”

Watch a video:
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Fareed Ayaz and Abu Muhammad (Pakistan)

Fareed and AbuFareed Ayaz, Abu Muhammad & Brothers Qawwal perform qawwali, the ecstatic devotional music of Sufi Muslims made famous in the West by Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. The ensemble has gained international recognition for its renditions of both the popular traditional form and the more introspective ancient classical qawwali that is seldom heard today. Similar to gospel in its use of call-and-response and spiritual fervor, qawwali songs are accompanied by percussive handclapping, harmonium, tabla (drums), and a chorus. Qawwali (Urdu for “utterance”) songs range from 13th century mystical Persian poems to more recent Punjabi poems that speak of the intoxication of divine love. The qawwali singer or qawwal is regarded as God’s interpreter, and devotees sometimes enter into trance. The group sings in many languages, including Urdu, Punjabi, Sindhi, Hindi, Persian, Arabic, Bengali and Purbi.

The ensemble’s Qawwali music has its roots in one of qawwali’s oldest schools, the Qawwal-Bachcha gharana, set up by the legendary musician and poet, Hazrat Amir Khusrau, in 12th century Delhi. Their music sits between the sub-continent’s classical (Khyal, Dhrupad and Thumri) and rich folk traditions. Both Fareed and Abu go out of their way to explain the layered nuances of the ancient Sufi poetry as well as explaining the traditions of qawwali, a quintessentially spiritual form of music. Audiences are an essential part of performances as they engage in a dialog with the musicians to shape and uplift the performance, sometimes repeating the couplets and at other times taking the performance in unexpected directions.

Watch a video:
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Cimarrón (Colombia)

CimarronFrom the cattle rearing, Llanos Orientales region of Colombia, Cimarrón performs the festive dance music of joropo, a fiercely virtuoso display of rippling melodies and powerful rhythms combining Andalusian, Indigenous Indian and African roots. Led by harpist Carlos Rojas, these musicians seek to explore and experiment with their rich heritage whilst retaining the essence of the tradition. They are immersed in the sounds of “los llanos” and the musical fireworks created by harp, bandola, cuatro, bass, cajon, maracas and high-pitched voices are simply breathtaking.

In creating and leading the group Cimarrón since 1986, harpist Carlos Rojas looks both backward and forward in time. Looking back to the joropo’s roots, he sees it fundamentally linked to dance, for in rural social occasions, the sound of the dancers’ feet became an essential part of the musical whole. In contrast, when the music is taken out of this social setting and placed on the concert stage, it loses the sounds of the dance and becomes “joropo chamber music,” changing the traditional musical intent. This approach, of making records and playing concerts, he says, “would seem to be more directed at magnifying the virtuosic, soloistic display of the musicians and to the nearly exclusive intense valuing of the joropo singer’s talents.”

Looking to the future, Rojas “redesigned” the basic musical ingredients of the joropo, bringing the rhythmic roots that resonate with the dance and that typically underpin the joropo’s melodies and harmonic accompaniment to the forefront of the sound. This meant both adding a rhythm box (cajón) to the instrumentation to evoke the rhythmic sound and spirit of the dance, and insisting that joropo dance (and song) be part of the performance whenever possible. This “new mix” creates “a new balance, a new relation among the acoustical weightings of percussion, strings, and voices within the joropo sound.”

This innovation has played well to national and international audiences, as the group was invited to perform at the WOMEX world-music showcase in Seville (2008), WOMAD in London (2009), the biennial flamenco festival in the Netherlands, the Shanghai Exposition (2010), and tours in Wales, Western Europe, and the United States. Cimarrón’s album Si Soy Llanero was nominated for a Grammy in 2005.

Cimarrón's visit is funded by Southern Exposure. Southern ExposureSouthern Exposure is a national initiative designed to promote a greater understanding and appreciation of the richness and diversity of Latin American cultures through the work of its contemporary and traditional performing artists. The program supports tours that are collaboratively developed by presenting organizations across the United States.  The touring projects include public performances and activities that provide the public with direct interaction with the visiting artists.  An emphasis is placed on funding engagements in communities that have little access to this type of work.

Southern Exposure is a program of Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation made possible through the generous support of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Watch a video:
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Germán Díaz (Spain)

German DiazGermán Díaz is a zanfona (hurdy-gurdy) virtuoso who travels through different styles with the Spanish folk instrument and moves musical borders. At his performances, he also uses music boxes, the looper and hand organ. His current project, Cardiophonic Method, is based on the rhythms of the human heartbeat, as recorded on vinyl by a doctor during the 1940s; the recordings were passed on to Germán by his father, who was also a medical doctor. With the help of these recordings and several mechanical instruments which play music from punch cards, Herman creates a unique performative soundscape, walking the line between free improvisation (the metaphorical heart) and the rigidity created by the music box and looped heartbeats (the physical heart).

Germán Díaz's novel approach to traditional music has led him to be called "the Jimi Hendrix of hurdy-gurdy." He has collaborated with numerous other musicians, including the Galician bass player Baldo Martinez and guitarist Antonio Bravo.

Watch a video:
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Joy Harjo (Mvskoke Nation)

Joy HarjoJoy Harjo was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma and is a member of the Mvskoke Nation. She has released five award-winning CDs of original music and in 2009 won a Native American Music Award (NAMMY) for Best Female Artist of the Year for Winding Through the Milky Way. Her most recent CD release is a traditional flute album: Red Dreams, A Trail Beyond Tears.

Her seven books of poetry, which includes such well-known titles as How We Became Human—New and Selected Poems, The Woman Who Fell From the Sky, and She Had Some Horses have garnered many awards. These include the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts; the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas; and the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. For A Girl Becoming, a young adult/coming of age book, was released in 2009 and is Harjo’s most recent publication.

She also performs her one-woman show, Wings of Night Sky, Wings of Morning Light, which premiered at the Wells Fargo Theater in Los Angeles in 2009 with recent performances at the Public Theater in NYC and La Jolla Playhouse as part of the Native Voices at the Autry. She has received a Rasmusson US Artists Fellowship and is a founding board member of the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation. Harjo writes a column “Comings and Goings” for her tribal newspaper, the Muscogee Nation News.

Joy will also be doing a poetry reading during the Saturday's free Global Fiesta.

"With a double shot of heart, beauty, freedom, peace and grace that blends traditional Native rhythms and singing with jazz, rock, blues and hip-hop, Harjo is right at the top of the best contemporary American poetry and music artists.”
—Thomas Rain Crow, The Bloomsbury Review

Watch a video:
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Ricardo Lemvo (Angola/Congo)

Ricardo LemvoRicardo Lemvo has established himself as a pioneer with his innovative music. Lemvo's blend of Afro-Cuban rhythms with pan-African styles (soukous, Angolan semba and kizomba) has been described by the Los Angeles Times as “seamless and infectious.” 

This Congo-born artist of Angolan ancestry is the embodiment of the Afro-Latin Diaspora which connects back to Mother Africa via the Cuban clave rhythm. Lemvo is truly multi-cultural and equally at home singing in English, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Lingala, and Kikongo. 

Since forming his Los Angeles-based band Makina Loca in 1990, Lemvo has refined his craft and vision, raising his joyous voice with strength, singing songs that celebrate life, and most importantly, inspiring his audiences to let loose and dance away their worries. 

Through the years, Lemvo has performed countless shows in many festivals, night clubs, and performing art centers throughout Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Australia. His five CDs have been enthusiastically acclaimed by both print and broadcast media worldwide. 

"Whether they're kicking out Cuban jams or taking Afro-pop to the bridge, Lemvo and company will make you sweat." (Time Out New York)

Watch a video:
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Lone Piñon (New Mexico)

Lone PinonLone Piñon plays traditional New Mexican fiddle tunes and folk songs from the region of El Rio Grande del Norte. They are inspired by New Mexican musicians Cleofiz Ortiz and Cipriano Vigil, who have played this music in their communities and across the southwest. Lone Piñon also plays Fandango Son music from Mexico, having spent time in Veracruz and Oaxaca learning from local musicians. Along with these styles, they incorporate their love of high-lonesome two part harmony singing from classic country and old-time music. Lone Piñon is Greg Glassman on guitar and vocals, Jordan Wax on violin, accordion, and vocals, and Noah Martinez on guitarron.

"We feel very strongly about the value of regional music, and its role in its community," Glassman told the Columbia Daily Tribune. "Many of these tunes have specific dances that go along with them, and we've hosted several house parties where we’ve taught the dances to friends, and friends of friends. Most of the newer generation of New Mexicans aren’t playing this music anymore, or learning the dances, so in our own humble way, it feels good to us to be a part of keeping a true regional art form and expression of joy alive."

"Their southwestern folk flavor and Spanish lyrics had audience members smiling and salsa-ing for the entire performance." (Vox Magazine)

Watch a video:
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Emel Mathlouthi (Tunisia)

Emel MathlouthiTunisian vocalist, songwriter, and guitarist Emel Mathlouthi captivates hearts and minds with her intimate, lyrical style, fierce rock beats, and throbbing trip-hop and oriental influences. Mathlouthi tells the story of HER Tunisia: the dark years as a young rebel and dissenter; the strife of being a female musician; her artistic and ideological struggle after her songs were banned from the radio and TV; and the dual love and suffering that came from longing for home while living in a free country.

Emel began her artistic career at the age of 8 in Ibn Sina, a suburb of Tunis. At age 25, oppressed by the Tunisian government because of her music, she moved to France to pursue her career as a singer, and then in 2014 she took another step in her career and moved to New York City.  She has been said to evoke the urgency of American folk singer, Joan Baez, with the devotion of a chanter of ancient sacred music and the presence of a soul diva.  She has given concerts in Saudi Arabia and all over the Middle East, as well as Europe and North America.

Her passion and courage is evident in her deeply confessional music and powerful presence.  Her song "Kelmti Horra" ("My Word is Free") was taken up by the Arab Spring revolutionaries and sung on the streets of Tunis. Her arrangements include electronically sampled sounds of the Arab Spring street protests, speeches from the deposed Tunisian president, and the announcement of resignation from Egypt’s former President Hosni Mubarak. But regardless of the words, her voice itself evokes a yearning for freedom and change. She has quickly become a voice of the revolution and a shining musical light for the future.

Watch a video:
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Otava Yo (Russian Federation)

Otava YoSteaming out of St. Petersburg in white vests, a peasant dress, ushankas on head with ear-flaps akimbo, Otava Yo bring the proud traditions of Russian folk to the digital age, causing mass outbreaks of circle-dancing and Slavic pogoing on the dance floor. Lyrical gusli, global guitar, wailing bagpipes, energetically expert dual fiddle-scraping, pumping bass and pounding drums, driving songs of rural romance, heroic sailors, goats and pancakes, delivered with casual wit and bursts of ensemble choreography. Otava Yo have performed at major European folk festivals and as far afield as Mexico and India. They have met the President of Estonia and received an award from the Bratislava Humor Academy. They play Russian-Gothic R&B, among other things.

"Equal parts punk and Russian folk... With a lineup of lyre-like gusli, bagpipes, fiddles, guitar, bass and drums, they brought huge energy and serious fun to an outdoor WOMEX stage." (NPR, Top 10 Musical Discoveries From WOMEX 2014)

Watch a video:
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Slavic Soul PartySlavic Soul Party! (USA/Balkan)

Throbbing funk grooves, fiery Balkan brass, Gypsy accordion wizardry, and virtuoso jazz chops make Slavic Soul Party! NYC’s official #1 brass band for BalkanSoul GypsyFunk. SSP! has created an acoustic mash-up of Balkan and Gypsy sounds with North American music, weaving the gospel, techno, funk, dub, jazz, and Latin influences of New York’s neighborhoods seamlessly into a Balkan brass setting. SSP!’s music has won the ears of fans and musicians on both sides of the Atlantic. They have performed at Babylon (Istanbul) with the Karandila Orkestar, at Irving Plaza (New York City) with Gogol Bordello, on the Warped Tour (U.S.), in Carnegie Hall, in Sing Sing prison, and in virtually every major New York club.

"Madcap rhythms, hyperactive horns, a sense of the absurd, and just a hint of abstract jazz... everything you could want in a record." (NPR, All Things Considered)

Watch a video:
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Nano Stern (Chile)

Nano SternNano Stern’s path as an artist follows richly crafted song lines laid by his family and his Chilean musical ancestry, and unites those with a sound utterly fresh and relevant. The grandson of Jewish refugees fleeing persecution, Nano’s childhood was painted vivid by not only his own family’s activism and musicianship but by the powerful legacy of the Nueva Canción movement lead by Chilean musical activists during Pinochet’s dictatorship a generation before. Legends like Inti-Illimani and Victor Jara—who suffered exile and even death during these troubling times—continue to inspire Nano’s breadth of sound and emotion. “I am extremely respectful of the tradition,” explains Stern, “It is an enormous gift we received from the people of the past.”

When only fifteen, Nano joined popular Chilean underground band Mattoral, and thus was initiated into the fresh, new sounds and socio-political pulse of the South American rock/punk scene. The thick rock-energy of Mattoral, his classical and jazz training, and the powerful influence of traditional, Chilean revolutionary music make for something purely Nano. What has emerged is a powerhouse artist, brilliantly layering indigenous, African, and European elements into a sound all his own, and humbly bringing audiences to tears, to their feet, and to reverie with a singular kind of emotion and soulfulness unlike any other South American artist performing today.

Folk legend Joan Baez remarked, “[Nano] may be the best young Chilean songwriter of his generation. With his lyrics, melodies, message, delivery, humor and heart, he gets my vote.” Agile across a range of instruments, Nano’s closest companions remain simply his guitar and staggering vocals, and with them come fluent, extraordinary musicianship and a wide-open heart.

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